Posts tagged world building
Why Commit to a Book Series: Pros and Cons

If you’ve ever thought about writing a series, but were too overwhelmed by how much work it would take, you are not alone. Many authors find series daunting, but they are worth the time and effort. Book series build super fans and allow you to dive deeper into characters and settings. Discover why you should commit to a book series.

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Once Upon an Autumn Eve: How to Read Like a Writer

Have you ever read a novel with such a vivid setting, you wanted to visit that place or use it to inspire your own stories? Dennis L. McKiernan’s Faery in Once Upon an Autumn Eve is such a place. From McKiernan’s novel, writers can learn how to create a world readers hate to leave and strong female characters.

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Cinder: How to Read Like a Writer

Beginnings are challenging. If you’re searching for the best place to start your story, read the first chapter of Cinder by Marissa Meyer. You’ll learn how you can start with action without using violence and how to introduce your characters and world in a way that keeps your story moving and uses description, exposition, and dialogue.

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The Sleeper and the Spindle: How to Read Like a Writer

The Sleeper and the Spindle is a young adult short story transformed into a graphic novel. Written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Chris Riddell, it is an excellent example of how the written word and visual art can come together to create an engaging story. If you’re thinking about combining text and image, or another kind of creative partnership, read this book.

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When Demons Walk by Patricia Briggs: How to Read Like a Writer

Do you have a book you read over and over because you can’t stop thinking about the characters, world, and story? When Demons Walk by Patricia Briggs is that book for me. The novel lingers with its readers because Briggs breaks a few rules, conventions, and tropes, which you can learn to do too.

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Emily St. John Mandel: How to Read Like a Writer

Dystopian fiction is a popular current trend. If you want your story to stand out from the crowd, read Station Eleven. Emily St. John Mendel transforms dystopias. Through a twisted timeline, multiple points of view, and the importance of art, she speculates on how society might carry on after a pandemic deadlier than the Spanish Flu.

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Multiple Points of View: Benefits, Pitfalls, and Uses

Sometimes you need to tell a story from more than one character’s perspective, but you don’t want to have the distance of omniscient. That’s when multiple points of view can be the best choice for your story, but like all points of view, it has its pros and cons.

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Versailles by Kathryn Davis: How to Read Like a Writer

If you find historical events and people inspiring, read Versailles by Kathryn Davis. Davis transforms the famous palace to tell a story larger than the main character, while giving Marie Antoinette the voice and freedom to tell her own story. Discover how you can use these same techniques to enliven your writing.

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Omniscient Point of View: Benefits and Pitfalls

If you’re telling the story of a place or event or that requires revealing the inner thoughts and emotions of multiple characters, omniscient might be the right point of view for you. It is challenging perspective to pull off, so you’ll need to learn and manage the pros and cons.

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Hounded by Kevin Hearne: How to Read Like a Writer

If you’ve ever wondered how to write a page turner, read Hounded by Kevin Hearne. Using a narrator with an outstanding sense of humor, strategic chapter breaks, and a unique cast, this debut novel is a page turner worthy of a close read.

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman: How to Read Like a Writer

What do people mean by read like a writer? Find out by exploring the techniques master world builder and wordsmith Neil Gaiman used in his award winning novel The Graveyard Book. Discover how he ignited his ink and created a story that haunts readers of all ages and genres.

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