Posts tagged plot
How to Properly Plan a Dynamic Book Series

If you’re the type of author who loves to make things happen in your stories, a dynamic book series might be for you. These plot-based books are driven by events, but you do need to make sure you have enough plot for a series and can learn to love the middle of a story. Learn how.

Read More
How to Effectively Plan an Anthology Book Series

If you like the freedom to explore, an anthology book series might be the best choice for you. Tied together by setting or related characters, these series are the most open. Discover how you can plan your series using your world and/or characters.

Read More
How to Successfully Plan a Character-Driven Static Book Series

Writing a book series is a wonderful, terrifying, time consuming process. If you’ve decided to commit to a static series — one that’s driven by your characters — you need to develop a character readers want to read more of and make sure you have enough ideas to fill you books. Here’s how to get started planning your static book series.

Read More
Why Commit to a Book Series: Pros and Cons

If you’ve ever thought about writing a series, but were too overwhelmed by how much work it would take, you are not alone. Many authors find series daunting, but they are worth the time and effort. Book series build super fans and allow you to dive deeper into characters and settings. Discover why you should commit to a book series.

Read More
3 Types of Book Series: Writing Best Practices

Writing a book series is a great way to build a career as an author. Readers love series. However, if you’re going to commit to that many polished words in one story, you need to understand what type of series you’re writing, so you know what readers want and can deliver the kind of book series they can’t get enough of.

Read More
Once Upon an Autumn Eve: How to Read Like a Writer

Have you ever read a novel with such a vivid setting, you wanted to visit that place or use it to inspire your own stories? Dennis L. McKiernan’s Faery in Once Upon an Autumn Eve is such a place. From McKiernan’s novel, writers can learn how to create a world readers hate to leave and strong female characters.

Read More
Setting as Obstacles: How to Make Your Environment Impact Your Plot

Strong settings impact your plot because you are using them as more than a backdrop. If you can pick up your story and move it to a different place and/or time, you are not using your setting effectively. Transform your setting into obstacles your characters must overcome, so your plot advances and your characters have to make decisions.

Read More
Scythe: How to Read Like a Writer

Not all stories have built in conflict. Neal Shusterman managed to find conflict in utopia. From his novel Scythe, writers can learn to find the conflict in seemingly perfect situations, consistently make things worse to hold reader interest, and effectively use journals.

Read More
Elizabeth’s Midnight: How to Read Like a Writer

It’s easy to get lost in complex plots and world building, but not every story needs a web of ideas. Sometimes a story is about one person and their journey. Aaron Michael Ritchey focuses on a single character and plot arc in Elizabeth’s Midnight. His unique, fully developed characters and “what could be worse” plot make his novel linger with readers.

Read More
The Purpose of Quality Description in Creative Writing

Description immerses your reader in your story. Quality description focuses on showing the details that impact your story and is key to your readers’ ability to experience and picture your setting, characters, and events. If you want your readers to feel something when they read your writing, you need to use quality description.

Read More
The Flower Man by Mark Ludy: How to Read Like a Writer

There are many ways to tell a story. It can be written, spoken, sung, even shown through images. Mark Ludy illustrates how one man can change a community through wordless, vibrant images in The Flower Man. If you need to brush up your characterization and body language techniques, start with this book.

Read More
How to "Show Don't Tell" in Creative Writing

Any writer who’s taken a writing course or been a part of a critique group has probably heard the phrase “show don’t tell.” You may have even said it yourself. Why should you show? Showing — especially in instances like backstory, setting, and emotion where telling is easy — will advance your plot and deepen your characters.

Read More