Posts tagged experimentation
Fra Keeler by Azareen Oloomi: How to Read Like a Writer

Insanity is a common theme in literary fiction and fear in people. If you’re using this dark, relatable trope, read Fra Keeler to learn how Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi uses stream of consciousness, symptoms of madness, and internal conflict, so her readers experience what it’s like to go insane alongside her narrator.

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How to Survive Your M.F.A. in Creative Writing

If you’ve decided to earn a MFA in Creative Writing or are on the fence, you need to know what it’s like inside the program. You will study writing and have time to write, but you’ll also have to deal with genre favoritism, lack of professors, and other aspects out of your control. I survived my MFA. Here’s how you can too.

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Ghosts by Sophie Calle: How to Read Like a Writer

Sometimes the story we wish to tell is not our story. In Ghosts, Sophie Calle uses a collection of voices to tell the story of missing museum art pieces. Learn how to combine interviews to create a larger story and build distinct character voices from Ghosts.

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When Demons Walk by Patricia Briggs: How to Read Like a Writer

Do you have a book you read over and over because you can’t stop thinking about the characters, world, and story? When Demons Walk by Patricia Briggs is that book for me. The novel lingers with its readers because Briggs breaks a few rules, conventions, and tropes, which you can learn to do too.

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Europeana by Patrik Ourednik: How to Read Like a Writer

When an author wants to create a specific effect or tone, sometimes the traditional layout of text on a page doesn’t work. You need something slightly or vastly different. Patrik Ourednik experiments with form in nonfiction Europeana to generate an objective historical account. Other authors can learn from and borrow his form.

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Second Person Point of View: Benefits and Pitfalls

Second person is one of the most difficult points of view to use, but in specific situations, it is vital. If you want your reader to not only live vicariously through your characters, but literally participate in your story, second person might be the best perspective for you.

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The Book Thief by Markus Zusak: How to Read Like a Writer

An example of a narrator other than the main protagonist, The Book Thief uses word choice, form, and voice to show Death's perspective on humans during World War II. By studying Markus Zusak’s novel, you can learn how to do this in your own writing.

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