Posts tagged conflict
Setting as Obstacles: How to Make Your Environment Impact Your Plot

Strong settings impact your plot because you are using them as more than a backdrop. If you can pick up your story and move it to a different place and/or time, you are not using your setting effectively. Transform your setting into obstacles your characters must overcome, so your plot advances and your characters have to make decisions.

Read More
Scythe: How to Read Like a Writer

Not all stories have built in conflict. Neal Shusterman managed to find conflict in utopia. From his novel Scythe, writers can learn to find the conflict in seemingly perfect situations, consistently make things worse to hold reader interest, and effectively use journals.

Read More
Perspective in Creative Writing: Who Is Telling Your Story

Perspective is the lens through which you tell your story. Which lens you choose affects your reader’s experience and opinion of your characters. Make sure you’re making the best choice in protagonist, point of view, and your personal preferences for your story’s perspective.

Read More
Elizabeth’s Midnight: How to Read Like a Writer

It’s easy to get lost in complex plots and world building, but not every story needs a web of ideas. Sometimes a story is about one person and their journey. Aaron Michael Ritchey focuses on a single character and plot arc in Elizabeth’s Midnight. His unique, fully developed characters and “what could be worse” plot make his novel linger with readers.

Read More
Born to Run by Christopher McDougall: How to Read Like a Writer

Whether you're interested in running long distances or not, Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superalthetes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall is a must read for any aspiring nonfiction writer. McDougall employs concepts, conflicts, characters, and causalities often associated with fiction to share the knowledge he gained while asking "Why does my foot hurt?"

Read More
Why Nonfiction Needs to Tell a Story

Humans are psychologically wired to remember and understand stories. Using basic story structure and elements from fiction will help your nonfiction book stand out and deliver the information driving your need to write in a way that will linger in your reader's memory.

Read More