Posts tagged character
Why Commit to a Book Series: Pros and Cons

If you’ve ever thought about writing a series, but were too overwhelmed by how much work it would take, you are not alone. Many authors find series daunting, but they are worth the time and effort. Book series build super fans and allow you to dive deeper into characters and settings. Discover why you should commit to a book series.

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3 Types of Book Series: Writing Best Practices

Writing a book series is a great way to build a career as an author. Readers love series. However, if you’re going to commit to that many polished words in one story, you need to understand what type of series you’re writing, so you know what readers want and can deliver the kind of book series they can’t get enough of.

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It Happened One Doomsday: How to Read Like a Writer

Writing with emotion doesn’t mean you need to create a soap opera story. Emotion can be subtle, overwhelming, positive, and negative. In It Happened One Doomsday, Laurence MacNaughton tells the thrilling story of a weak sorceress determined to save a demon and stop the apocalypse, while keeping his readers smiling. You can learn to keep a dark situation light and use setting to your advantage by reading his novel.

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What Is Tone and How to Use It in Creative Writing

Whether you realize it or not, your attitude toward what you write about seeps into your piece. When readers say a piece is whimsical, sentimental, critical, or vindictive, they are referring to the author’s and characters’ attitudes. They are talking about the tone of your piece. Just like tone of voice, your writing’s tone impacts your story’s meaning.

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Once Upon an Autumn Eve: How to Read Like a Writer

Have you ever read a novel with such a vivid setting, you wanted to visit that place or use it to inspire your own stories? Dennis L. McKiernan’s Faery in Once Upon an Autumn Eve is such a place. From McKiernan’s novel, writers can learn how to create a world readers hate to leave and strong female characters.

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Scythe: How to Read Like a Writer

Not all stories have built in conflict. Neal Shusterman managed to find conflict in utopia. From his novel Scythe, writers can learn to find the conflict in seemingly perfect situations, consistently make things worse to hold reader interest, and effectively use journals.

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Perspective in Creative Writing: Who Is Telling Your Story

Perspective is the lens through which you tell your story. Which lens you choose affects your reader’s experience and opinion of your characters. Make sure you’re making the best choice in protagonist, point of view, and your personal preferences for your story’s perspective.

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Elizabeth’s Midnight: How to Read Like a Writer

It’s easy to get lost in complex plots and world building, but not every story needs a web of ideas. Sometimes a story is about one person and their journey. Aaron Michael Ritchey focuses on a single character and plot arc in Elizabeth’s Midnight. His unique, fully developed characters and “what could be worse” plot make his novel linger with readers.

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Cinder: How to Read Like a Writer

Beginnings are challenging. If you’re searching for the best place to start your story, read the first chapter of Cinder by Marissa Meyer. You’ll learn how you can start with action without using violence and how to introduce your characters and world in a way that keeps your story moving and uses description, exposition, and dialogue.

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Exposition, Description, and Dialogue: How to Find the Balance

The balance between exposition, description, and dialogue is essential to the success of your story. They significantly impact your pace, show interactions between your characters, immerse your reader in your scenes, and reveal time has passed. Learn when to use each of these techniques, so you can find the best balance for your story.

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The Purpose of Quality Description in Creative Writing

Description immerses your reader in your story. Quality description focuses on showing the details that impact your story and is key to your readers’ ability to experience and picture your setting, characters, and events. If you want your readers to feel something when they read your writing, you need to use quality description.

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Proof A 30th Street Fiction Anthology: How to Read Like a Writer

To understand how a critique group can improve your writing, look at how 30th Street Fiction critique group impacted “The Mortician’s Assistant.” I share before and after lines from my story, so you can see how critique impacted my piece and what it can do for your writing.

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The Flower Man by Mark Ludy: How to Read Like a Writer

There are many ways to tell a story. It can be written, spoken, sung, even shown through images. Mark Ludy illustrates how one man can change a community through wordless, vibrant images in The Flower Man. If you need to brush up your characterization and body language techniques, start with this book.

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